PELAGIE ISLANDS

    Posted by Giuseppe Martino on

    To the south-west of the Sicilian coast, between Italy and the Tunisian coast , there is the small archipelago of the Pelagie islands, composed of Lampedusa, Linosa and Lampione. Their name derives from the Greek and means 'high sea': here, in fact, we are really far from everything (Lampedusa is two hundred and ten kilometers from the Sicilian coasts!) and from any point of the archipelago you look at the sea, you can only see an endless expanse of water. Although in their reduced dimensions, these small paradises offer to the visitor very different vacations between them. A bit of worldliness combined with the tranquility of beach life can be found in Lampedusa. Uncontaminated nature, great silences and an important ecological heritage are instead the treasures of Linosa. Lampione, its younger sister, is an island so small that it has only a lighthouse on the surface, but it has rocky walls that plunge into the sea practically vertically at a depth of more than sixty meters and that offer to divers uncontaminated territories where to meet the gray shark, groupers, lobsters and pink and yellow coral. Next to the Pelagie islands there is the island of Pantelleria, where nature marries with that rural architecture that has become famous in the world. In Pantelleria in fact, land of farmers rather than fishermen, scattered in the territory there are dammusi, small houses built in order to collect rainwater for periods of drought and to create within them a perfect microclimate for the hottest months. Dammusi alternate with the gardens of Pantelleria, with high stone fences that protect citrus groves and crops from the violence of the wind that blows tenaciously and powerfully for many months a year. Everything is immersed in a nature that both for the flora and the fauna is defined as North African more than continental.


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